About

Welcome to HypnoBirthing Saskatoon.

The term “natural childbirth” was coined by obstetrician Grantly Dick-Read upon publication of his book Natural Childbirth in the 1930s, which was followed by the 1942 Childbirth Without Fear. It is a philosophy of childbirth based on the notion that women who are prepared (for an event that has been happening to women for thousands of years) are innately able to give birth to their child, without external intervention.

Historically, women gave birth at home, assisted either by a midwife, family physician or family members. During the 19th Century, the onset of the Industrial Revolution led to cramped living quarters and at times, unsanitary living conditions, prompting the move  from delivering at home to delivering in a hospital. This was true for women of the lower and middle class, while wealthy women still laboured and delivered at home. As the availability of hospitals increased, women became receptive to the promises of safer and less painful births. By the 1940’s, it became commonplace for women to be medicated to the point of unconsciousness, with their babies delivered by forceps. Other interventions such as routine enemas, shaving, intravenous drips and the strapping down of womens’ hands became routine. [1]

However… the trend towards such practices also prompted the movement back towards natural childbirth.

Marie Mongan is one such trailblazer.

Using the theories of Dick-Read, Marie Mongan experienced the births of her own children, and then went on to perfect what is now called HypnoBirthing® – The Mongan Method.

At HypnoBirthing Saskatoon, we’re pleased to be able to bring Marie’s methods to women in Saskatchewan.

Please continue on to learn more about us, and if you choose… Marie Mongan.

Sources:

[1] Wikipedia – Natural Childbirth

  • Cassidy, Tina (2006). Birth. New York: Atlantic Monthly Press. pp. 54–55. ISBN 0-87113-938-3.
  • Thompson, C.J. (2005). “Consumer Risk Perceptions in a Community of Reflexive Doubt”. Journal of Consumer Research 32: 235–248. doi:10.1086/432233